The Right Questions

Of the things we think, say, and do we will ask ourselves—

1. Is it the truth?
2. Is it fair to all concerned?
3. Will it build goodwill and better friendships?
4. Will it be beneficial to all concerned?

I have been an active member of Rotary International for 24 years. Rotary has 1.2 million members in 200 countries. This network of clubs has one big goal, which is to promote ethics in business and peace in the world though strategic investments of financial resources and hands-on action. One of this organization’s many objectives is the eradication of polio in the world. I still marvel at the effective stewardship and influence of this 110-year-old organization.

The Power of Rotary
The power of the organization is founded on the core value of “service above self.” Underlying this value is the real leverage of Rotary: it is individual members’ shared commitment to a simple criteria for living and working each day, as expressed in what is called The Four-Way Test (as you read above).

Dr. William E. Hull, in his book The Four-Way Test—Core Values of the Rotary Movement, states, “The Four-Way test does not decree how we are to honor these four criteria but only puts them in the form of questions which we must answer for ourselves. In the pluralistic world of the twenty-first century, differences run so deep that the best place to begin a dialogue is not by discussing our conflicting answers, but rather to agree on what are the right questions.”

Question Your Meetings
On a more day-to-day note—have you ever wondered if there is a way to prevent meetings from lasting so long and accomplishing so little? My experience is that if you change the meeting agenda from a list of topics to be discussed to a list of questions to be answered, 50% of your meetings will never need to be held, because you’ll find you can answer the questions without a meeting. And the meetings you hold will take 50% less time, if you agree that the meeting will dismiss when the questions are answered, not when your scheduled meeting time is up.

Journal Entry: Are you facing a potential divisive conversation or dreading another unclear meeting? Could settling on the right questions beforehand possibly help all concerned get what they want and have more time for the good stuff in leadership and life?

Resource: To learn more about Rotary International check out Rotary.org.

 

He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes; he who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. – Chinese proverb

You can have everything in life you want, if you help enough other people get what they want. – Zig Ziglar from See you at the Top

If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself. – Henry Ford

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. – Leonardo da Vinci

We thought that we had the answers, it was the questions we had wrong. – Bono

One man there had been an invalid for thirty-eight years. When Jesus saw him lying there and learned that he had been in this condition for a long time, he asked him, ‘Do you want to get well?’ – John, a disciple, from the book of John chapter 5 verses 5 & 6 – The Bible’s New Testament

 

Leadership and Life Journal: A new way to look at the important things you already know.